Objectif Terre

Objectif Terre

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“The hydrogen economy would be a massively wasteful economy " Tony Seba, Stanford

Publié par Olivier D sur 10 Avril 2017, 19:07pm

Pour celles et ceux qui n'auraient pas encore compris que l'Hydrogen Economy constitue une menace écologique majeure.

“The hydrogen economy would be a massively wasteful economy " Tony Seba, Stanford

wasteful = gaspillage

“The hydrogen economy would be a massively wasteful economy that would at best use three to six times more energy than an electric vehicle and solar/wind infrastructure and many times more water than even gasoline uses.”

To build a so-called “Hydrogen Economy” you need to build a multi-trillion dollar infrastructure with large factories/refineries, pipelines, trucks, storage facilities, compressors, hydrogen gas stations, and so on. If you haven’t noticed, this mirrors the existing oil & gas infrastructure (...)
It makes sense for the fossil fuel industry to lobby for the hydrogen car because hydrogen is essentially a product line extension for them

Voiture à hydrogène: un gaspillage massif d'eau douce:

"A well-to-wheels analysis by University of Texas Professors Carey W. King and Michael E. Weber found that a HFCV would need to withdraw 13 gallons of water per mile driven. The same study concludes that a gasoline car would need withdrawals of needs 0.63 gal H2O/mile and a diesel car would need 0.46 gal H2O/mile. That is, gasoline petroleum-based transportation is 20 to 28 times more water efficient than hydrogen.

If we use solar or wind power as the source of the electricity for hydrolysis then you could have ‘clean’ and technically ‘renewable’ Hydrogen. I say ‘technically’ because the world is already pumping water at non-sustainable, non-renewable rates and the massive amounts of water you’d need for hydrogen would just contribute to the world’s water crisis. A 2015 World Economic Forum report ranks water crises as top global risk, up from number three the previous year."

“The hydrogen economy would be a massively wasteful economy " Tony Seba, Stanford

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